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or elevate you denigrate human life. you have make everything relative. in germany right now there is a movement to legalize bestiality because they don't believe there is a difference between humanity and animals. 'canes gross! >> greg: once you equate animals to humanity you lose out in the industry. in food and land. >> kimberly: what were you reading? >> eric: where have you been? >> greg: i happen to be at a cafe with jasper that made me ill. >> dana: in la jolla, california, seal cove. they all go down there a you have to protect those. and there is all the different government agencies. nobody can get to clean the rocks. the bird poop. so some tourists don't want to have to smell it. >> kimberly: do you blame them? they have to clean it up. it's super smelly. birds in the area pooping. >> kimberly: but they don't go properly clean it. >> eric: they won't allow the businesses and private ownership to go and clean it on their own terms. >> greg: a question for bob. if lion's share of fracking were in blue states would federal government shut it down in >> bob: most of i
be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there. i have some video looking at what the kind of new german energy future or present looks like. you have times when half the power in germany is being produced by renewables. you have a tremendous explosion of wind and solar generation. how did this happen, dave? how did germany begin to undertake this? >> it's a fascinating story. the german law doesn't cost -- this is what it says. it doesn't cost the government any money. electric rate payers pay an extra fee to subsidize people who install solar or wind. people who install solar and wind are guaranteed a higher than market rate of return for something like a decade. these are called feed-in tariffs to keep with green's, you know, aptitude for great terminology. >> screw it. tomorrow we're doing an how on that. >> yes. i had dinner with the parliamentian in germany that got this passed last year. i asked him, this one law is like a lever transforming one of the biggest ind
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
, not made in germany, not made in china, not made in the u.s. made in the world. 60% of trading manufacturers is in some -- the import content of exports at rate worldwide was 20% years ago, is 40% now and might be 60% 20 years from now. so it's a totally different world from the one many people have in mind where, you know, your country was producing country which my country was consuming and this was a sort of relationship, hands, export this, import that. in this world, the global value changes. you need to import in order to export and use your competitive advantage. so it's a different pattern and i think this has consequences which most governments have, i think, not yet really realized, which is why we've launched this initiative together with the oecd to sort of measure trading at a value and we will probably be unveiling the first batch of trade in value added numbers mid january. our statistical missions are working extremely hard. these guys won't have a great christmas break, but i think that will look very, very, very difference from what we have today. >> just in t
of the most successful year over year appreciations of any developed country's equity markets? >> germany. >> bingo. i think of their own currency it's up like 30%. let's keep going. >> okay. so germany has been the engine of european growth. if germany slows down, the dynamic in europe is going to change dramatically. if this euro/yen goes through let's say 120, 125, 130 which is what they're pushing for, the german auto sector which has made great inroads against the japanese because the euro/yen as the japanese have held the yen has been over valued that is going to change the whole european dynamic. a slowing germany will become a wild card. that's my call for the biggest wild card in 2013. >> i tell you what. you have to go nose to nose with a country on the foreign exchange front, i think the japanese are going to be well matched with the mentality of what is going on in germany. listen, merry christmas. i know hannukah is over and you had a great hannukah. >> thank you. >> best holiday wishes to all the viewership from two old time traders. back to you. >> two of the best that is.
, but the average income tax rate for individuals in the euro zone is 42%, including countries like belgium, germany and france with some rates above 50%. in the united states, the average income tax rate is 29%. federally, 39.6% is the highest rate. someone will pay in the united states. so for today's q&a, are americans getting a bargain or are europeans getting ripped up? let me go first. 60 seconds on the clock starts right now. economies richard cost money to run. there is misplaced popularity in the libertarian myth that governments don't need to involve themselves in most economic matters and that markets will handle whatever needs to be handled. we need taxes. and we need safety and services and infrastructure in return. in some cases, it is simply more economical for governments to provide services because a scale. health care might be one example. the building and maintenance of smart grids and roads. so think of taxes not as needing to be low but of the return from those taxes of needing to be high. now traditionally, richard, that worked in europe. now it doesn't. they got the math badly
the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the americans with disabilities act. >> the treaty was supported by organizations representing people with disabilities and veterans groups but that was not good enough for 38 republicans. it was supported by senator john mccain, himself a disabled veteran. >> bob dole has been our leader on the issue of disabilities from the moment he stepped foot into the chamber. to
germany, italy, england, and austria from staalin and his successors even though they are now strong enough to meet a threat which in fact doesn't exist. i just had my very able aid marcus rose check this for me. over the last ten years we have spent $3.8 billion in medicare. that's true. during that same period we spent $5.6 billion on the military. the military has been going up fast faster and it includes an awful lot of expenditure, unnecessary. we're reading today that canada is recoring whether they're going to buy the f-35. the f-35 is a very, very well conceived airplane that's proving to be a great financial disaster. if any agency, the decht housing, the department of education, the department of energy, had a disaster as remotely expensive to the taxpayer as the f-35 my conservative friends would be screaming. so yeah, i agree with them. ironically. that's one area where the republicans want to spend more, where mitt romney criticizes the president for not spending enough. and i'm very encouraged, ed, that in this last election for the first time in my memory a democratic
estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> welcome back. if today's market action is any suggestion of what's to come, where do you put your money now? >> where do you put your money in the final five trading days of the year? >> well, i think you want to position yourself for growth, for global growth. the u.s. is slowing, so you wan
could. go national. go like a pro. >>> this is a lucky marzipan pig which in germany is a symbol of riches and wealth and strength and fertility, and at the new year you give it to those you love to wish them luck. >> this is a chimney sweeper, a symbol of good luck especially if you touch the button on the chimney sweeper's coat. >> happy new year from germany. >>> they're not your average christmas carols. the music group celtic woman has been putting an irish twist on traditional songs for eight years. their second album is called "home for christmas." jessica dunn caught up with the women after a performance at the atlanta symphony orchestra. ♪ >> it's very excited to get to sort of feel that power that you have at the start of the show when the music starts and it takes everybody on the journey. ♪ >> i think all over the world i think there is that sort of common thread of christmas is being with your family and celebrating being together. >> i would be happy to sing clibs mass music every month of every year. i love it. it's just fantastic. very special when you get the
. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should be rules in place on background checks. our country is founded on these freedoms. i totally respect the constitution by the way. what i don't respect is what i don't respect is the interpretation of the letter of the second amendment of the constitution which i think is being misused to endorse everyone in america. >> the constitution talkses about a well regulated militia. the power of the government not to take away guns and every american should exercise personal responsibility. by not putting their children at risk of suicide and murder. yes, people should be punished but we shouldn't encourage criminal cond
there really divergent from the rest of europe. germany up on the right, a good gain up over 1%, the italian market falls by 1%. silvio berlusconi is back in italian politics proving he still runs his party and withdrawing support from mario monti. this may lead to midterm elections because monti is market friendly you might not end up with a market friendly solution. we thought we'd have elections march/april, there's the prospect it could be a snap election much earlier perhaps in the new year. now the good news is there isn't a huge amount of blowout on the bonds at the short end of the italian markets. the yields are higher but not huge relative to where we've been but on the ten-year italian market you can see we're slightly higher but no great shakes overall. it means the rally in the peripheral bond market we've witnessed in italy and spain has now stalled at this stage. remember we had the auction in spain yesterday and the yields are slightly higher relative to where we've been, they're still relatively depressed. we talk about the problems in europe, i thought it was worth pointing
shop. they have received orders for bouquets from around the world. >> we got some from germany. we got some from new britain. where else? california. florida. kansas. any place you can think of, we've gotten a call. >> reporter: at the post office, so many condolence cards and letters have poured in, a special box has been set up to collect a mountain of notes for later distribution to the families. the firehouse which was the emotional epicenter for parents frantically looking for their children on that morning, received 26 breathes from a christmas farm in oregon. mike tadry made simple crosses for each victim. and delivered them today. >> nobody can stop the pain of what these people are going through. it's a tragedy beyond comprehension. it really is. >> reporter: and there's the local watering hole. the newtown general store. the manager got a call this morning from a stranger offering to buy coffee for anybody who needed some warm comfort. a kind gesture poured out into 100 cups. >> everybody was here crying. you know, people from the town. it was very kind. >> reporter: we found
by better than seven points and the nasdaq futures up, as well, by about 17. european shares rising. germany is up, the ftse is up, the france, the cac in france has turned slightly down. but, again, this is a marginal loss of about three points. most of the major asian stock markets were higher overnight. and among the catalyst here, signs that china's recovery is gaining traction. sources say that the bank of japan will ease monetary policy this week and consider adopting a 2% inflation target no later than january. policymakers are seen responding to pressure from the incoming prime minister there. shinzo abe for stronger efforts to beat deflation. in the meantime, india's central bank kept interest rates on hold yesterday ignoring pressure to reduce borrowing costs. policymakers said they were shifting the focus to reducing the economy and that raises the odds of a rate cut as early as january. andrew olson, over to you. >> ubs reportedly nearing a fine of up to $1.5 billion. the bank is close to finalizing a deal with regulators according to the financial times. about three dozen banker
call. asia was up 13. europe was up 12. adding employees to europe, france, germany, very strong. similar to what bill mcdermott has been saying. we are all so doom and gloom about europe, ellison's talking about it's a bright spot. >> what about germany today, up again for december, as we mentioned at the top of the show, above $1.33 a day. something's going on there. the big upgrade on greece. that's kind of strange, right? >> up four or five notches. >> i have to stand up for a second. $8. >> is it finally time? >> i want to click my heels, but these are soft reeboks. you wouldn't hear it. >> are we going to see that, finally, at last? >> the way people were coming on and saying it's going to zero. >> running for the exit. >> when was the euro dissolved and greece kicked out? what was the date? >> it happened just in reverse. >> it was overnight. >> we'll see. i can't believe 2013 will not hold a couple of moments where we go, ah. but it is amazing. nothing we can do. >> we're afraid spain is going to come -- spain was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens wh
this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [la
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
you see what's been going on in germany? they came out and acknowledged there was a possibility of a recession early next year in germany. that's a real concern right now after germany has a new 52-week high in stocks. you'll have strong headwinds in december and january for the german market. they are talking about growth of 0.4% next year for germany gdp. it was 1.6%, guys, just six months ago. that's a pretty severe downgrade. back to you. >> wae'll see you later. as we said earlier this morning, u.s. job growth picked up in november with nonfarm payroll increasing and unemployment rate falling to 7.7%. the lowest level since december 2008. joining us from the white house this morning for our first on cnbc interview is alan krueger, chairman of the council of economic advisers. good morning. >> good morning. >> as residents of the northeastern united states, a lot of us are still trying to get our heads around the idea that sandy didn't affect these numbers at all. are we almost certain to get some major revisions next month? >> the bureau of labor statistics reported that th
. she has stage four cancer. we have to go. get her to 250,000. before she goes to germany for more treatment. there is an election in louisiana.
is it that germany, a country that has 1/4 of the population of the united states, exports more than what the united states does? because if you look at our tax code, that's broken, it needs reform, industries in the united states that are employing americans are given two-year tax credits and we expect those american companies to make generational commitments on a two-year tax credit. you look at places like germany, they're providing 10-year tax credits that sends a signal, a signal of certainty, a signal of clarity to businesses in germany, that there is a commitment to embrace innovation and technology, to remain competitive in the manufacturing economy. manufacturing today is not labor-intensive. it's capital-intensive. you always have to be in a continuous improvement mode. but that requires one thing. it requires a confidence in the american people, a confidence in the american worker, in making the kind of commitments that are necessary to compete with china. i often hear people on this floor, every day, whining about china. yeah, china cheats on their currency. they treat their workers poor
. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. >>> trip adviser and deutsche bank. >> deutsche bank likes this company. people love it. trip adviser is king. >> deutsche buying a hold on apache. >> apache has been such a dog. bad for apache. >> an a darko? >> ever since the daily, and other litigation, this is an inexpensive stock. i-like it. >> deutsche on omc. >> what's interesting, they're talking about negative momentum in ad
. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other brand. you can say, jim, that's not even -- i mean, what percent -- i am a real fan customer for kirkland.
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expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commi
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sweeper's coat. happy new year from germany. >>> regarding the impending fiscal cliff, we have seen a lot coming from washington, but what about the boss? and by that i mean the american people, and they are angry. josh levs is covering that part of the story and he joins us now. >> yes, we are seeing a lot of frustration and anger, and that is a big part of the story in the country right now. we are following a lot of the developments and reading the tea leaves in washington, but the fact is that around the country, the mounting frustration and concern about what could happen to you and your taxes and a lot of people are sounding off. we have been getting a lot of videos today and ireport, and take a look at this one. >> my mes sang to all of washington for the new year is partisanship aside and working on fixing this mess that you have gotten us into. and bring a ball lapsed budget to the table and fix it in the long term and not the short term. >> this one struck me today because it got us thinking to the young people in the country and what the message the congress is sending to the y
a lot of things to do. we know the fact that a country like germany has 158 gun deaths a year and we have 9,000 to 10,000 a year. we know what has to be done. i mean, if we could really do what we should do, i would make it a crime to possess, after a period of buy-backs, a crime to possess an assault rifle or high capacity magazine. as it is a crime to possess drugs. that's certainly more harmful than drugs. that's not likely to happen but the least we can do is ban the sale of assault weapons, ban the sale of high ammunition clips, get rid of the gun show loophole under which anyone can buy a gun -- >> on site. >> -- on site at a gun show. ban gun trafficking, that is limit sale of guns to one a month or something so you can't go to virginia, buy 40 weapons and ship it illegally into new york where you have stronger gun control laws. these are things we can do, we know to do, and we know will greatly reduce the number of innocent people killed every year. they won't eliminate it but they will greatly reduce it. i was struck by the fact that everybody is going to investigate adam la
it. we're about the only country that doesn't. industrial i'd countries in the western world germany, canada, have 150, 170 people killed a year by guns. we have over 9,000. and the only difference is they have intelligent gun laws and we don't. >> and here is one very important basic fact. 40% of all gun sales in america don't require a background check. which means through 40% of gun sales, a convicted felon, a terrorist, somebody dangerously mentally ill can get a gun without any questions asked. >> well, in this situation, the mother purchased the firearm. >> and it's also important when we react to tragedies like this not to strive to prevent every possible tragedy. you know, maybe this one, maybe some others would actually still slip through the cracks. but the bottom line is you talked about the fact that there are 34 murders that happen every day in our country. to the extent that the murder are committed by people who could have prevented from buying guns like without background checks, then that's the kind of thing we should be talking about. >> or even prevented from buyin
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industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully investing. >>> haj way brought back 1.2 billion from the stock of an estate from an unnamed investor. this is one day after buffet advocated for a higher tax when the wealthier die. though 120% of book value from 110%, let's look at berkshiurke haj way shares. they are up $4100, sue. in this trading session. >> a perfect stocking suffer, i think for you, ty. >>> thank you very much. inaugural deal book opportunity for tomorrow held in new york city today and cnbc had exclusive access to the like of jamie dimon, blake and mark andresen. hi, kayla. >> hi, sue. we have takes on the morning spesh especially with the all important fiscal cliff. he says he didn't mind when there is gridlock. when the government does something it usually ends up i
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the best translators in this country. it will be like east germany because people will be afraid to be themselves that's why we have the fourth amendment. >> steve: i wonder how many terrorists activities or plots have been stopped by this program. >> you know, a good question. we probably will never know. >> steve: because it's a question -- which is the greater risk? that we listen in on some international phone calls or another 9-11? >> that's a very good question ask judgment that the congress is not permit to do make because the fourth amendment -- >> steve: that is what they're too long. >> ha is what they're doing. when the congress changes the constitution, it is acting unconstitutionally. only the states. you just talked about amending the constitution. only the states can change the constitution. so the fourth amendment says you want to snoop? get a search warrant. judges available 24/7. >> gretchen: read your column on foxnews.com and i hope i see you on studio b. i'll be hosting for sheppard. >> what a lively day this will be. >> merry christmas. >> steve: make up you
close to an 8 1/2-month high. germany at a 52-week high. the euro at a 7 1/2-month high. things are still moving. china, big debate on the trough here. this is the debate the last two months here. goldman sachs upped its fourth quarter gdp estimates, 7.8% now instead of 7.6%. look, nobody's thinking china's going to go back to 10% or 12%. that's over. 8, 8 1/2, somewhere around there. there is good evidence now that q-4 might be the trough for china. this has been a big debate. a lot of people saying it's going to be weaker in 2013. real estate prices are improving. electricity consumption improving a little bit. industrial production, all of them looking better in the last couple of months. i think that's generally a positive. the one big thing i want to point out, if you watch what's going on in japan, we've got a new prime minister who's coming in who's putting intense pressure on the bank of japan, essentially trying to break their independence essentially. he's told them they've got to increase their inflation target from 1% to at least 2%, and told they have to start massi
germany. >>> it's the top of the hour. you're in the "cnn newsroom." i'm martin savidge. let's a pleasure to be with you. >>> right now in the nation's capital, senators are working to try to keep all of us from going off that fiscal cliff. we've been talking about that for what seems like, well, forever. they've got to reach a deal by new year's day. here's what's happening right now. senate leaders on both sides are trying to reach a budget deal hoping to avert a 2% hike in everyone's paychecks early next year. plus 2 million unemployed people stand to lose their jobless benefits. jessia yellen, the president says he's optimistic but he sure had a firm tone after meeting with the senate and house leaders yesterday. let's just give that a listen. >> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. why everything always has to wait till the last minute. well, we're now at the last minute. and the ame
campaign to run germany for a third time. the election is in the third quarter of next year. she actually warned against premature optimism over the crisis saying the worst is not over and we must be cautious going forward. now to a certain extent she would say that, would she not? otherwise we're not out of the woods. keep me in charge. but that was the message that came out of germany today. elsewhere as we kind of wait for things to happen, it's interesting the bond markets continue to rally. we were talking about this yesterday that greece has priced the debt buyback where it has. it will be more generous and next week they're likely to get their money from the rest of the european union. taking some of those concerns back out of the market so, again, today the spanish bond market rallying and, therefore, the yield forming. still above 5% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of the
voted for rug declaring war on japan and germany. back to present-day politics, we now know that the u.s. supreme court plans to dive into one of the most talked about and emotional issues of our age. whether same-sex couples have the right to marry. the high court is taking on two cases, one involving the federal defense of marriage act, or d doma, and another involving california's proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in that state. for analysis into these historic cases, what's going to be a historic hearing, i want to bring in kinji yoshityoshito, professor of constitutional law at new york city. great to see you. >> good to see you. >> put prop 8 aside for a second. do you believe that the supreme court will strike down doma. this is what what you've said. walk me through your thinking on that one. >> y bet. so doma is a really narrow challenge insofar as what the statute does is it says for federal purposes marriages are defined between one man and one woman. so i think it might be best to clarify this by example. so you take edie windsor, a plaintiff coming out of new york
kindergartners and their teacher. we've seen it in australia, germany and canada and brazil. give us a sense or perspective here in terms of how does the united states hold up? how do we compare to some of the violent acts here and around the world? >> suzanne, you know, the world has been looking on in real shock and grief and horror at what happened. it is instructive, despite the difference of various culture and despite the difference of, you know, second amendment rights and things like that to see how the rest of the world has tackled these incidents. you mentioned dunblane in scotland in 1996. children of the same age who were mowed down in sandy hook elementary were killed then. within a year and a half, the government banned the private use and ownership of handguns. there was stiff penalties, and there were even jail sentences if these bans and if the law was breached. they had a strict buy-back and amnesty plan, and do you know what? it worked. it didn't work immediately, but between 2003 and 2011, the number of gun-related crimes in great britain dropped off 44%. then you look at
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